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Grand Australian Adventure

  • Departure Date13 Nov 2024
  • Holland America Line Westerdam
  • 40 Nights Cruise & Stay
  • Prices From £5,179 per person

Itinerary

  • Stay 2 nights in Sydney
  • Sydney
  • Newcastle, NSW, AU
  • Brisbane
  • Airlie Beach
  • Cairns
  • Darwin, Australia
  • Komodo Island
  • Broome
  • Exmouth, Australia
  • Geraldton, Western Australia
  • Fremantle
  • Albany, Australia
  • Port Lincoln
  • Adelaide
  • Penneshaw, Kangaroo Island
  • Melbourne
  • Hobart
  • Port Arthur, Tasmania
  • Sydney

With its iconic cities, wild-beauty and weird but wonderful wildlife, why wouldn’t you want to visit Australia? There truly is no better way to experience this continent than on a cruise holiday. Kick start this trip with an exciting 2 night stay in the vibrant city of Sydney where you can take in spectacular views from the Sydney Tower’s outdoor platform, the Skywalk or peacefully people watch on Bondi Beach before embarking the majestic Westerdam. You'll then circumnavigate its entirety in 35 nights, marvelling at its stunning landscapes, unimaginably blue waters and stylish cities. You’ll stop off at Australia’s major cities and some hidden gems, see natural wonders like the Great Barrier Reef and the outback and encounter Australia’s famous wildlife and, of course, the friendly locals. This is the trip of a lifetime.

Highlights

  • FREE Sydney Stay
  • Ultimate Australian Adventure
  • Upgrade for only £60pp per day & get: Signature Beverage Package, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion Discount, WiFi & Gratuities 

What's Included?

  • Return flights from UK (call for regional departures)
  • FREE 2 night stay in Sydney on room only basis 
  • 35 night cruise on board Westerdam on full board basis
  • Upgrade for only £60pp per day & get: Signature Beverage Package, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion Discount, WiFi & Gratuities

Prices From pp

Departure DateInteriorOceanviewBalconySuite
Nov 2024£5,179£7,999£7,999£9,649

Price based on flying from London. Transfers are not included. Prices are subject to availability and may change out with our control. Flight supplements from regional airports will apply. For a live price for your chosen date, airport and hotels please call our Cruise Experts.

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Westerdam

Recently updated with new bar, entertainment and dining venues, plus completely reimagined suites, Westerdam is a fascinating destination in her own right.

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Itinerary for Grand Australian Adventure

Day 1 - Fly UK to Sydney

Day 2 - Fly UK to Sydney

Day 3 - Enjoy Sydney

Day 4 - Enjoy Sydney

Day 5 - Embark Westerdm in Sydney

If you want a snapshot of Australia's appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers' wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too. The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city's best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café. Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you'll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia's cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

Day 6 - Newcastle, NSW, AU

Day 7 - At Sea

Day 8 - Brisbane

Queensland’s capital, tucked between the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast, is often overlooked in favor of its stylish sister, Sydney, and its cultured cousin, Melbourne. But Brisbane, or "Brissy" for short, has recently come out of the shadows to show off its own variety of sun-drenched cool. Brisbane may be a contender for Australia’s hippest city, thanks to its clutch of crafty bars, eclectic restaurants and homegrown fashion. The city's subtropical climate brings joggers and cyclists to the banks of the Brisbane River year round; jacarandas and frangipani bloom in the spring. This is one of the country's fastest-expanding areas in terms of population and employment: People flock here for the affordable lifestyle, the booming economy and the laid-back attitude. When newcomers arrive, creativity follows, as evidenced by the museums and theaters of South Bank and the revived districts such as Fortitude Valley. Fortitude is a good word for Brisbane—a hardworking city on its way to fame and fortune. VIEW CRUISES

Day 9 - At Sea

Day 10 - Airlie Beach

Airlie Beach is the gateway to the Australia of your dreams. Although the Queensland town offers many antipodean delights such as palm-fringed beaches, a huge man-made lagoon and alfresco dining, there’s a great reason to head straight out of town: This is the jumping-off point for the magnificent Whitsundays, a group of 74 islands that are famous for their timeless natural beauty, white-sand beaches and crystal-clear water.Your options here are pretty much limitless—charter a boat and sail around the archipelago; snorkel or scuba dive the Great Barrier Reef; or snap the perfect selfie on sublime Whitehaven Beach, consistently named among the best beaches in the world. There are many other activities closer to shore—from kayaking to glass-bottom boat tours—as well as hiking through lowland tropical rain forest in Conway National Park, for those who want to keep their feet firmly on the ground. And if you’re simply looking to kick back with a drink in hand and enjoy the magnificent views, head to cosmopolitan Hamilton Island, the largest inhabited island of the Whitsundays, for its stylish restaurants and bars.Note: Stinger (jellyfish) season in the Whitsundays is from October to May; you’re advised to wear a stinger suit in the water during this time.

Day 11 - At Sea

Day 12 - Cairns

The gateway to Australia's Great Barrier Reef and the tropical north of the country, Cairns sits on the east coast of the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland. This laid-back city is popular with travelers who depart from here for days of sailing, diving, snorkeling and trekking through nearby parks—a celebrated launching pad especially for those who want to explore the reef, the Daintree Rain Forest and other attractions of this part of Queensland. And what better place to start one's adventure? The residents of Cairns are welcoming, the beach life fantastic and the climate consistently sunny and warm. Wend your way due east of Cairns, and you'll find yourself on the Great Barrier Reef, the world's longest coral reef and also the world's largest living organism. Famously visible from outer space, it's often been described as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Kuranda Scenic Railway is a different sort of wonder—an engineering marvel from the 19th century that passes through rain forests on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites before reaching the village of Kuranda. Green Island, a 6,000-year-old coral cay, is an easy day trip from Cairns with opportunities to snorkel and swim; Port Douglas, an hour north of Cairns, is a favorite with visitors thanks to its top-notch restaurants, art galleries and boutiques. Finally, hop on a six-person cable car known as the Skyway Rainforest Cableway for a bird's-eye view of the stunning natural appeal of the region.

Day 13 - Ribbon Reef Region

Day 14 - Far North region

Day 15 - At Sea

Day 16 - Darwin, Australia

Surrounded on three sides by the turquoise Timor Sea, the Northern Territory’s capital is closer in both distance and temperament to Southeast Asia than it is to most of Australia’s major cities. The lifestyle here is tropical, which means a relaxed atmosphere, balmy weather, fabulous fusion food and vibrant outdoor markets. This cosmopolitan city has fewer than 140,000 residents, but they include some 50 nationalities. After heavy bombing in World War II and a disastrous cyclone in 1974, Darwin has been largely rebuilt, and it's modern and well planned. In the downtown area you'll find everything from great shopping to a crocodile park. You can trace the region's dramatic history at innovative museums and gallery-hop to see indigenous art. After your sightseeing stroll, have a late lunch at one of the many excellent restaurants. The food options range from authentic Malaysian dishes like laksa, a spicy noodle soup, to a plethora of fresh seafood—mud crab, barramundi and more. You may find it hard to leave this laid-back lifestyle, but there's much more to see close by. Darwin is the gateway to two famous national parks, Kakadu and Litchfield, as well as the spectacular Aboriginal-owned Tiwi Islands. Make sure you take the time to "go bush," as they say in Australia—that is, get out of town and relax. There's no better place to do it than this glorious part of the country.

Day 17 - At Sea

Day 18 - At Sea

Day 19 - Komodo Island

One of more than 17,000 islands that make up the Republic of Indonesia, Komodo Island is most famous for its resident Komodo Dragons. The remnant of a once widespread ancient order of monitor lizards, this giant reptile often measures up to 11 feet in length and can weigh more than 300 pounds. Komodo Island is volcanic in origin, with dramatic landscapes of craggy mountains, deep canyons, savannahs and rain forests. Sample shore excursions: Komodo Island Trek.

Day 20 - At Sea

Day 21 - Broome

Built on the traditional lands of the Yawuru people, Broome is a center for the pearling industry, a vacation destination and an internationally significant habitat for millions of migrating birds.

Day 22 - At Sea

Day 23 - Exmouth, Australia

Located on the North West Cape of Western Australia, the port of Exmouth is home to the wonders of Ningaloo Reef. Ningaloo Marine Park boasts hundreds of miles of beach fringed coast, where you can watch dolphins, manta rays, sea turtles and more. Away from the beach you’ll find an Outback range with caves and red rock gorges to explore. Sample shore excursions: Western Australia Scenic Beauty; Snorkel Ningaloo Reef; Top of the Range: Cape Range National Park.

Day 24 - At Sea

Day 25 - Geraldton, Western Australia

This sun-washed coastal city in the Mid West region of Western Australia has roots that extend back 40,000 years through the Wajarri people. Their distinctive paintings, combining dots of ochre and earth-based pigments, are among the many treasures on display in the Geraldton Museum. You can experience the past and present of a working Western Australian farm at the Oakabella Pioneering Homestead, built in 1860. Tour the original homestead, cookhouse, shearing shed, stables and blacksmith shop. This is wine country, so you’ll want to stop by a local winery and sample the region’s award-winning sauvignon blancs, chardonnays and more. The pleasant Mediterranean climate is perfect for kitesurfing, windsurfing, saltwater fishing, boating and sailing, so take your choice. For outback adventures, head to Kalbarri National Park, where the Murchison River has sculpted deep gorges and breathtaking vistas

Day 26 - Fremantle

Located between the Indian Ocean and Australia's famed Outback, Perth and Fremantle are rich in Aboriginal and British colonial history. Explore historic Fremantle and modern Perth; visit the Swan Valley region for vineyard tours and witness koalas and kangaroos in their natural habitat; and travel to the Outback and watch a desert sunrise over Ayers Rock. Sample shore excursions: Perth & Fremantle Highlights; Vines & Wines; Ayers Rock, the Olgas & the Outback Overland Adventure.

Day 27 - Fremantle

Located between the Indian Ocean and Australia's famed Outback, Perth and Fremantle are rich in Aboriginal and British colonial history. Explore historic Fremantle and modern Perth; visit the Swan Valley region for vineyard tours and witness koalas and kangaroos in their natural habitat; and travel to the Outback and watch a desert sunrise over Ayers Rock. Sample shore excursions: Perth & Fremantle Highlights; Vines & Wines; Ayers Rock, the Olgas & the Outback Overland Adventure.

Day 28 - Albany, Australia

Established in 1826, Albany was the first European settlement in Western Australia and quickly grew into a bustling commercial hub. Its historic heart has a certain faded grandeur, while the modern waterfront is undergoing major redevelopment. The area’s most striking features, however, predate the original settlement. Its natural wonders include stunning coastline stretching from Torndirrup National Park’s majestic cliffs to the tranquil bay at King George Sound. In the interior, the peaks of the Stirling Range reach heights of more than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) and offer opportunities for day hikes with breathtaking views. During the 19th century, Albany played an important role as a center of shipping between Britain and its Australian colonies, as it was long the only deepwater port on the continent. It was through Albany that some 40,000 Anzac troops departed for Europe, an event that is being recognized through 2018 with a series of events marking the centennial of World War I. The Whaling Station here, which did not cease operations until 1978, has been converted to a fascinating museum on the history of the industry. It has the distinction of being the last operating station in both the Southern Hemisphere and the English-speaking world. Humpback, southern right and blue whales continue to be pursued here, though now by curious sightseers on whale-watching cruises during the annual whale season from June to October. Today, “Amazing Albany” earns the adjective the city has bestowed upon itself, as it draws travelers eager to explore an unexpected and amazing corner of Australia.

Day 29 - At Sea

Day 30 - At Sea

Day 31 - Port Lincoln

Up the coast from Adelaide, Australia, the nutrient-rich waters and sheltered bays surrounding the Eyre Peninsula—bounded by the Spencer Gulf to its east and the Great Australian Bight, an enormous bay, to its west—support an abundant marine life. And that marine life, in turn, supports Port Lincoln, a town at the tip of the peninsula that's the seafood capital of South Australia. In addition to ensuring delicious tuna and plump oysters on local menus, the wealth of fish means there is a variety of wildlife here, including aquatic birds, sea lions, dolphins, whales and great white sharks. (For the particularly adventurous, there are opportunities to join the sharks in their natural habitat by signing up for a cage dive).Among the highlights of Port Lincoln are the spectacular views of Boston Bay (a natural harbor three times the size of Sydney’s), mansions built by local tuna millionaires and several interesting art and handicrafts galleries. Nearby Coffin Bay is home to oyster farms where you can sample one of the area’s most famous products, as well as a national park with wild ponies. The Eyre Peninsula also has several award-winning vineyards that produce wines to complement your visit to Port Lincoln.

Day 32 - Adelaide

With a burgeoning creative class, top-notch wining and dining, and a pace of life that feels distinctly more leisurely than high-profile siblings Melbourne and Sydney, Adelaide has evolved into a must-visit destination. The biggest buzz is going on in the city's Central Business District, which has become the hub for artists, designers and restaurateurs, all breathing new life into a once-sleepy capital. Not everything changes though: The town's reputation as a genteel, leafy haven is still justified, and Adelaideans' love of sport—particularly Australian Rules football and cricket—continues unabated. You'll also soon notice that the citizens of Adelaide are devoted to fine wine and great food, and they're particularly proud of the world-class vintages being produced in the famous Barossa Valley wine region, another must-see when visiting South Australia. Even if you can't make it to the source, the city's excellent restaurants and bars showcase local wines, many of which—like the country's most famous red, Grange Hermitage—are worth traveling across the world for.

Day 33 - Penneshaw, Kangaroo Island

The Australian continent’s third-largest island—Kangaroo—enchants visitors with its mellow rhythms, which seem to be coming from a quieter and much simpler time. Even Penneshaw, its main ferry port, has a population of less than 300 people . . . and farmers sometimes still advertise for spouses on bulletin boards. Long roads run arrow-straight through the fields, scrub and dense gum forests of this spectacular unspoiled destination. It remains one of the best places to see Australian marsupials in the wild. Almost half the island remains bushland or national park, sheltering koalas, echidnas and a million or so tammar wallabies. Weighing just five to seven kilograms (11 to 15 pounds), these mini-roos flourish here, thanks to a dearth of foxes and other mainland predators. (Despite this strong population, the species, Macropus eugenii, remains on the endangered list.) Marine mammals also make a healthy showing on Kangaroo Island. Visitors can walk through one of the country's largest sea lion colonies and watch for rare southern right whales offshore.

Day 34 - At Sea

Day 35 - Melbourne

Melbourne is consistently voted one of the world's most livable cities—and for good reason. This is Australia’s cosmopolitan heart with cutting-edge art and architecture, historic galleries, attractions and museums, plus a dizzying range of restaurants, bistros, markets and bars. It's renowned for its sporting culture, home to the esteemed Melbourne Cricket Ground and Australian rules football teams. The famous laneways of Melbourne bustle with hidden bars and eateries, while myriad beaches and parks allow for the ultimate outdoor lifestyle and active things to do. It’s a melting pot of cultures and a city of gourmands who demand excellent food and find it everywhere—from modern Australian cuisine and delicious Asian fusion fare to low-key cafés serving the best coffee you’ve ever tasted. If you want to leave the city, Melbourne is the gateway to Victoria's world-class wineries and spectacular coastline sights. Visit the famous penguins at nearby Phillip Island or feast on local produce in the picture-perfect Yarra Valley. Wherever you go in and around Melbourne, you’ll be sure to understand why so many choose to call this beautiful corner of the world home.

Day 36 - At Sea

Day 37 - Hobart

Tasmania, once the butt of many jokes, is finally cool. The little Australian island is home to stunning landscapes, old-growth forests and exceptional local produce. Lording over all this goodness is Hobart, the island’s creative capital. Although its remoteness might once have made it feel provincial, the city has truly come into its own in recent years. It’s got one of the world’s best museums of contemporary art, vibrant markets, a cosmopolitan dining scene and eclectic music festivals. It’s also achingly beautiful, with a natural harbor setting and rugged Mount Wellington looming in the background. The city is compact enough to easily explore on foot. Start at the sandstone area of Salamanca Place with its hip galleries, artist studios and bustling cafés and bars, and then roam the quaint streets of Battery Point, one of Hobart’s oldest neighborhoods. Immerse yourself in nature at the gorgeous Botanical Gardens or head out of town to learn more about Tasmania’s dark—but fascinating—past. Fuel up on the freshest seafood straight from the Southern Ocean down at the waterfront, or feast on gourmet Tassie produce at one of the many excellent restaurants in town. Whatever you choose to do, we promise you won’t be bored.

Day 38 - Hobart / Port Arthur, Tasmania

Tasmania, once the butt of many jokes, is finally cool. The little Australian island is home to stunning landscapes, old-growth forests and exceptional local produce. Lording over all this goodness is Hobart, the island’s creative capital. Although its remoteness might once have made it feel provincial, the city has truly come into its own in recent years. It’s got one of the world’s best museums of contemporary art, vibrant markets, a cosmopolitan dining scene and eclectic music festivals. It’s also achingly beautiful, with a natural harbor setting and rugged Mount Wellington looming in the background. The city is compact enough to easily explore on foot. Start at the sandstone area of Salamanca Place with its hip galleries, artist studios and bustling cafés and bars, and then roam the quaint streets of Battery Point, one of Hobart’s oldest neighborhoods. Immerse yourself in nature at the gorgeous Botanical Gardens or head out of town to learn more about Tasmania’s dark—but fascinating—past. Fuel up on the freshest seafood straight from the Southern Ocean down at the waterfront, or feast on gourmet Tassie produce at one of the many excellent restaurants in town. Whatever you choose to do, we promise you won’t be bored.

The Port Arthur Historic Site is the best preserved convict site in Australia and one of the country’s most visited heritage attractions. Take a drive down Arthur Highway which forms part of the Convict Trail Touring Route and passes through breathtaking seascapes, rolling farmlands and little villages, vineyards, artists studios and sweeping bays.

Day 39 - At Sea

Day 40 - Sydney, disembark & transfer to airport

If you want a snapshot of Australia's appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers' wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too. The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city's best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café. Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you'll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia's cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

Fly Sydney to UK / Fly Sydney to UK/Arrive UK

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