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South American Circle

  • Departure Date29 Nov 2024
  • Princess Cruises Majestic Princess
  • 54 Nights Cruise & Stay
  • Prices From £5,249 per person

Itinerary

  • Stay 2 night Los Angeles
  • Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
  • Fuerte Amador
  • Lima, Peru
  • Pisco
  • Coquimbo
  • Santiago (San Antonio)
  • Puerto Montt
  • Amalia Glacier, Chile (Scenic Cruising)
  • Punta Arenas, Chile
  • Ushuaia, Argentina
  • Falkland Islands
  • Puerto Madryn
  • Montevideo
  • Buenos Aires
  • Santos, Brazil
  • Rio De Janeiro
  • Fortaleza
  • Dominica
  • St. Kitts
  • Fort Lauderdale

This incredible voyage  begins with a 2 night stay in Los Angeles; go star spotting in Hollywood, people watch as you wander along Venice Boardwalk and watch the sunset at Venice Beach. You will then board Majestic Princess for your journey through the South American Circle. You will have plenty of time to immerse yourself in the destination with overnights in ports such as Lima, where you can experience the bohemian charm of its Barranco neighbourhood, bustling Buenos Aires where you can enjoy a dynamic food scene and impressive art and architecture and Rio de Janiero where you can visit one of the seven wonders of the world, the magnificent Christ the Redeemer Statue. And, no cruise to South America would be complete without the breathtaking experience of scenic cruising around Cape Horn. Not only will you discover South America on this voyage, you will take in dreamy Caribbean ports such as Dominica and St Kitts. This is a vast and varied cruise, bursting with energy and a real “bucket list” destination.

Highlights

  • FREE Los Angeles Stay
  • Upgrade for only £50pp per day & get: All Inclusive Drinks, WiFi & Gratuities
  • FREE Princess Premier Upgrade from Princess Plus - Book by 04 Mar 24

What's Included?

  • Return flights from the UK (call for regional departures)
  • FREE 2 night stay in Los Angeles on room only basis
  • 51 night cruise on board Majestic Princess on full board basis
  • Upgrade for only £50pp per day & get: All Inclusive Drinks, WiFi & Gratuities
  • Baggage allowance

Prices From pp

Departure DateInteriorOceanviewBalconySuite
Dec 2024£5,249-£6,849£8,469

Price based on flying from London. Transfers are not included. Prices are subject to availability and may change out with our control. Flight supplements from regional airports will apply. For a live price for your chosen date, airport and hotels please call our Cruise Experts.

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Majestic Princess

Sail aboard Majestic Princess, the newest member of our fleet and enjoy the signature favorites you've always loved along with so many new exciting additions not found on any other Princess ship, including two new specialty restaurants with dinner menus crafted by two Michelin-star awarded chefs.

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Itinerary for South American Circle

Day 1 - Fly UK to Los Angeles / Enjoy Los Angeles

Day 2 - Enjoy Los Angeles

Day 3 - Embark Majestic Princess in Los Angeles

The City of Angels always hovers between dream and reality. Once a near-forgotten colonial outpost, the pueblo metamorphosed into an agrarian paradise before reinventing itself as a movie colony. Perhaps no other city owes so much to the technological innovations of the 20th century, from the automobile to the airplane. Little wonder that LA is oft described as the "dream machine." In LA, reinvention is a way of life. Yet this talent for change has created a city with a rich ethnic diversity and a sizzling culture. LA is the source for trends that migrate across the country and then the world. Where else can you enjoy a Thai taco or munch on a kosher burrito? Or travel from downtown's high rises to the beaches of Malibu, shopping in Beverly Hills along the way? Los Angeles is a port of embarkation and disembarkation for some cruises.

Day 4 - At Sea

Day 5 - At Sea

Day 6 - Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Puerto Vallarta is a resort town on Mexico’s Pacific coast, in Jalisco state. It is known for its beaches, water sports and nightlife scene. Its cobblestone center is home to the ornate Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe church, boutique shops and a range of restaurants and bars.

Day 7 - At Sea

Day 8 - At Sea

Day 9 - At Sea

Day 10 - At Sea

Day 11 - Fuerte Amador

Fuerte Amador, situated at the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal, is a man-made peninsula extending out into the Pacific Ocean. The one-mile causeway was created by connecting four small islands with rocks excavated from the Panama Canal. There are several shops, restaurants, and other specialty stores centered around a large marina that serves as a tender dock. The causeway also affords a panoramic view of Panama City's impressive skyline and serves as the home for the Smithsonian Institute of Tropical Research.

Day 12 - At Sea

Day 13 - At Sea

Day 14 - At Sea

Day 15 - Lima, Peru

In 1535, Francisco Pizarro labeled the open plains where Lima now stands as inhospitable. Despite the verdict of the great conquistador, Lima became the center of imperial Spanish power, a "City of Kings" where 40 viceroys would rule as the direct representatives of the King of Spain. With independence in 1821, Lima became Peru's capital. Near Lima, one of the world's most desolate deserts is home to the famed drawings of Nazca. These drawings inspired Erik von Daniken's best-selling book "Chariots of the Gods." With mysteries seeming to be part of Peru's history, perhaps these "drawings" are in fact "the largest astronomy book in the world."

Day 16 - Lima, Peru

In 1535, Francisco Pizarro labeled the open plains where Lima now stands as inhospitable. Despite the verdict of the great conquistador, Lima became the center of imperial Spanish power, a "City of Kings" where 40 viceroys would rule as the direct representatives of the King of Spain. With independence in 1821, Lima became Peru's capital. Near Lima, one of the world's most desolate deserts is home to the famed drawings of Nazca. These drawings inspired Erik von Daniken's best-selling book "Chariots of the Gods." With mysteries seeming to be part of Peru's history, perhaps these "drawings" are in fact "the largest astronomy book in the world."

Day 17 - Pisco

San Martin is your gateway to the quiet colonial town of Pisco and its fertile coastal valley. For thousands of years, pre-Columbian societies thrived in river valleys such as this. Utilizing sophisticated systems of irrigation, they transformed the harsh coastal desert into productive farmland. The legacy of these ancient people, from their giant geometric etchings on the desert floor to their ancient burial grounds, continues to draw curious adventurers from around the world. San Martin is also your gateway to two other mysterious marvels: the Inca palace complex at Machu Picchu and the Galapagos Archipelago.

Day 18 - At Sea

Day 19 - At Sea

Day 20 - Coquimbo

The port of Coquimbo is the gateway to La Serena, founded in 1544. Located in the transition zone between Chile's austere Atacama Desert and the country's fertile central valley, La Serena is a popular holiday resort. The nearby Elqui Valley is an agricultural center famed for grapes, papaya and cherimoya. The region was also home to the pre-Columbian Diaguita and El Molle cultures, noted for their fine ceramics and jewelry. La Serena's central Plaza de Armas is home to superb colonial buildings and a 19th-century cathedral. La Recova - the artisan's marketplace - features copper and silver jewelry, glass works and ceramics.

Day 21 - Santiago (San Antonio)

Nestled between rolling hills topped with colorful houses and meandering coastal dunes, the bustling city of San Antonio enjoys its reputation as the gateway to Chile's central valley and the capital of Santiago. With a population of over five million people, Santiago sprawls at the feet of the snow-capped Andes. Inland lies the sun-kissed wine regions of Casablanca and Maipo Maipo Valley, Chile's internationally renowned wine district.

Day 22 - At Sea

Day 23 - Puerto Montt

Puerto Montt is your gateway to Chile's magnificent Lake District. Here, snow-capped volcanoes gaze down on alpine valleys nestled among low hills. Glaciers carved out this terrain, leaving the jewel-like lakes in their wake. The Lake District was a magnet for German immigrants, and their legacy can be seen today in the manicured rose gardens of Puerto Varas, the "German Villages" like Frutillar, and the gabled homes with elaborate balconies of Puerto Montt. Despite a population of more than 130,000, Puerto Montt retains the feel of a small town. For a simple introduction to the city, walk along the waterfront road to the fishing port of Angelmo and browse the local artisans' stalls, then tuck into a snack in one of the small cafés along the way.

Day 24 - At Sea

Day 25 - Amalia Glacier, Chile (Scenic Cruising)

The Southern Patagonian Ice Field covered the entirety of southern Chile just 10,000 years ago. Today, this region gives way to the awe-inspiring channels and islands that comprise the fjords of southern Chile's Pacific Coast, which extend as far south as Tierra del Fuego and the Strait of Magellan. While cruising through the sparkling waters of Chile's legendary inlets, you'll be graced by the presence of snowcapped mountain peaks, majestic forests and spectacular blue-tinged glaciers that will take your breath away. The unspoiled scenery is filled with dramatic rock formations and abundant wildlife known for making their homes here, including sea lions, Peale's dolphins and a variety of seabirds that soar amid the splendor.

Day 26 - Punta Arenas, Chile

Punta Arenas lies atop rolling hills, looking out over the Strait of Magellan. In the days before the Panama Canal, this was a major port as ships plied the waters of Cape Horn. Punta Arenas remains a prosperous town today, thanks to its rich natural resources. The city is also the gateway to Chilean Patagonia, a maze of fjords, rivers, steppes, and mountains to the north. To the south lies the great frozen mass of Antarctica. Adventure awaits in any direction at this port located near the end of the earth. Across the Strait of Magellan lies Tierra del Fuego, the lonely, windswept island discovered by Magellan in 1520. The region was settled by Yugoslavian and English sheep ranchers in the 19th century.

Day 27 - Ushuaia, Argentina

Ushuaia is the southernmost city in the world and one of two main cities on the island territory of Tierra del Fuego. Shared by Argentina and Chile, "The Land of Fire" features unforgettable scenery and trails of discovery framed by the sea, forests, lakes and mountains.

Day 28 - Cape Horn, Scenic Cruising

Located on Chile's Isla Hornos in the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, Cape Horn is widely considered to be the southernmost tip of South America. The culmination of the Andes mountain range, the legendary Cape is prone to unpredictably strong winds, choppy waters, icebergs and rogue waves - none of which phase the Princess ships that sail here. Nevertheless, hazardous maritime conditions have protected the rocky region from human settlement, so you'll enjoy the same views as the earliest explorers discovered centuries ago. Unusual rock formations with deep grooves and granite cliffs covered in trees are its signature features. Navigating around the Cape was a near-impossible feat for sailors who braved its intense winds and treacherous waters in the 17th century. However, those fortunate enough to return from a successful trip were entitled to numerous benefits, including dining with one foot on the dinner table and wearing a gold loop earring to boast of their seafaring victory. Though Cape Horn became a significant trade route between the 18th and early 20th centuries, the opening of the Panama Canal rendered this route obsolete - but that hasn't prevented adventurers from recreational journeys to the Cape, or the bragging rights that come along with them!

Day 29 - Falkland Islands

Capital of the Falklands since 1845, tiny Stanley lies on the windswept tip of East Falkland Island. The Falklands long served as a way station for ships, particularly whalers, bound to and from Cape Horn. The islands' rigorous environment is immediately apparent: Stanley Harbor is dotted with the hulks of vessels that succumbed to the fierce winds and waves of the South Atlantic. While their strategic location led to important roles in both World Wars, the islands are best remembered as the cause of the 1982 war between Argentina and the United Kingdom. Today, travelers increasingly journey to the islands to view their rich assortment of bird and marine life. Colorful houses occupy the low rolling moorland bordering Stanley Harbor. Stanley's climate resembles London's - cool and rainy though summer visitors are often blessed with clear, sunny skies.

Day 30 - At Sea

Day 31 - Puerto Madryn

Fleeing the economic devastation of England's Industrial Revolution, Welsh settlers immigrated to Argentina in search of cheap land. Led by Viscount Madryn, one group of settlers sailed for Patagonia, founding the small city of Puerto Madryn in 1865. Life in Patagonia, however, was not easy. There were lonely prairies, brutally cold winters, and unrelenting winds. Still the Welsh survived, and today visitors can still see their legacy in Puerto Madryn and its surrounding communities. Puerto Madryn is your gateway to one of South America's largest breeding grounds for birds and mammals - Tombo National Reserve.

Day 32 - At Sea

Day 33 - At Sea

Day 34 - Montevideo

Nestled between the continent's two giants, Brazil and Argentina, Uruguay is the second smallest country in South America. More than half of the nation's population of three million reside in the capital of Montevideo, located at Uruguay's southernmost point on the Rio de la Plata. Although small in size, Uruguay has proven to be big-hearted - the country is one of the most literate nations in the world while Montevideo is one of South America's most interesting and cosmopolitan capitals. Montevideo is a charming city made up of 19th-century Beaux Arts buildings, parks, and historical monuments.

Day 35 - Buenos Aires

Founded in the early 16th century, Buenos Aires was transformed from a colonial port into a cosmopolitan metropolis - the "Paris of the South" - by the cattle boom of the 1880s. As in the American West, boom was followed by bust. But that did not stop Buenos Aires from becoming the city it is today. With its air of haunted grandeur, Buenos Aires is a place of icy intellect and smoldering passion. It is a city where the elegant Colon Theater, one of the world's great opera houses, stands in counterpoint to the working class barrios that gave birth to the tango. Perhaps the city's enigmas and contradictions are best embodied by its two most famous citizens - the reclusive librarian and literary genius Jorge Luis Borges and the showgirl turned First Lady, Evita Peron. The "Paris of the South" flaunts its European heritage. One of the pleasures of Buenos Aires is simply absorbing its charm and flavor, from Parisian-style confiterias - cafés - to the city's popular tango clubs.

Day 36 - Buenos Aires

Founded in the early 16th century, Buenos Aires was transformed from a colonial port into a cosmopolitan metropolis - the "Paris of the South" - by the cattle boom of the 1880s. As in the American West, boom was followed by bust. But that did not stop Buenos Aires from becoming the city it is today. With its air of haunted grandeur, Buenos Aires is a place of icy intellect and smoldering passion. It is a city where the elegant Colon Theater, one of the world's great opera houses, stands in counterpoint to the working class barrios that gave birth to the tango. Perhaps the city's enigmas and contradictions are best embodied by its two most famous citizens - the reclusive librarian and literary genius Jorge Luis Borges and the showgirl turned First Lady, Evita Peron. The "Paris of the South" flaunts its European heritage. One of the pleasures of Buenos Aires is simply absorbing its charm and flavor, from Parisian-style confiterias - cafés - to the city's popular tango clubs.

Day 37 - At Sea

Day 38 - At Sea

Day 39 - Santos, Brazil

Founded in 1546 by the Portuguese nobleman and adventures Brás Cubas, Santos shares an unusual distinction. It is one of Brazil's popular seaside resorts and it is also the largest commercial port in Latin America. The old city features classic colonial architecture and a superb botanical Garden. Santos is also your gateway to Sao Paulo, Brazil's largest city - and the seventh largest metropolitan zone on Earth. It was coffee that transformed Santos from a seaside resort into one of the world's great seaports. Today the port still ships a large portion of the world's coffee supply from its docks - in addition to cars, steel, oil, bananas and oranges.

Day 40 - Rio De Janeiro

Pulsing to a samba beat and thriving in the hedonism of Carnival, there is literally no place on Earth like Rio, as the city natives — the Cariocas — will tell you. Founded in the early 16th century, Rio was once the capital of Brazil. It remains the nation's cultural and spiritual center, a dazzling amalgam of Latin and African cultures, with more than five-million city inhabitants.

Day 41 - Rio De Janeiro

Pulsing to a samba beat and thriving in the hedonism of Carnival, there is literally no place on Earth like Rio, as the city natives — the Cariocas — will tell you. Founded in the early 16th century, Rio was once the capital of Brazil. It remains the nation's cultural and spiritual center, a dazzling amalgam of Latin and African cultures, with more than five-million city inhabitants.

Day 42 - At Sea

Day 43 - At Sea

Day 44 - At Sea

Day 45 - Fortaleza

This scenic coastal city is tucked away on the northeast corner of Brazil and is still relatively unheard of outside of Brazil. Still, Fortaleza is the country's fifth largest city. The city's growth has much to do with Brazilians discovering Fortaleza's beautiful beaches. Today, Fortaleza is a thriving city of some two million. Enjoy a long, leisurely stroll along the lengthy coastline of white-sand beaches. Fortaleza is the capital of the state of Ceara, which was the first state in Brazil to abolish slavery. And while Brazilians and tourists alike throng to the beaches, the thriving, colorful city offers its own treasures.

Day 46 - At Sea

Day 47 - At Sea

Day 48 - At Sea

Day 49 - At Sea

Day 50 - Dominica

Lying between Guadeloupe and Martinique is the island of Dominica--an unspoiled Caribbean paradise. The vibrant, rich rainforest is home to rare birds, including Sisserou and Jacquot parrots. Streams tumble down mountain slopes and thread fertile valleys on their short route to the sea. Dominica is also home to the last Carib Indians. When Columbus made landfall on his second voyage of discovery, this fierce tribe managed to keep the explorer at bay. And while the island proved a lure for both British and French planters, Dominica somehow managed to escape the trammels of civilization. This former British possession, independent since 1978, today lures visitors from around the world with its unspoiled beauty. As the islanders fondly say, "Apres Bondi, c'est la terre" (After God, it is the land). Tours may travel narrow, winding roads.

Day 51 - St. Kitts

Jagged volcanoes soaring above azure and turquoise seas, dense rainforests in myriad shades of green, rolling fields of sugarcane--welcome to St. Kitts. Along with its neighbor, Nevis, St. Kitts presents an exotic landscape more common to Polynesia than the Caribbean. The islands' terrain, rich soil, and climate made them ideal locations for raising sugarcane. In fact, St. Kitts and Nevis were once the crown jewels of the Caribbean. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Spain, France and England vied for control of the islands, with the English finally winning out in 1787. Today, British and French heritage is evident on both islands. Basseterre, the capital of St. Kitts, boasts fine, restored colonial buildings. Impressive Brimstone Hill Fortress, called the "Gibraltar of the West Indies," is one of the most impressive fortresses in the Caribbean.

Day 52 - At Sea

Day 53 - At Sea

Day 54 - Fort Lauderdale, disembark & fly UK

According to the popular 1960 beach movie, Fort Lauderdale is "where the boys are." The city's reputation as America's Spring Break capital, however, has been replaced with the more favorable image of a prime family tourist destination, attracting more than 10 million visitors annually. The most popular beach resort in Florida is even more rightly famed as the "Yachting Capital of the World," with more than 40,000 registered crafts calling its waters home. The city also prides itself on being the "Venice of America" with more than 300 miles of navigable waterways. Fort Lauderdale boasts world-class theaters, museums, sightseeing, and shopping.

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