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Coral Triangle, Volcanos, Great Barrier Reef & Indonesia

  • Departure Date01 Jan 2025
  • Holland America Line Noordam
  • 32 Nights Cruise & Stay
  • Prices From £3,749 per person

Itinerary

  • Stay 2 nights in Singapore
  • Singapore
  • Puerto Princessa, Palawan
  • Jayapura
  • Rabaul
  • Kiriwina Island
  • Conflict Islands, PNG
  • Cairns
  • Ribbon Reefs
  • Darwin, Australia
  • Dili, Timor-Leste
  • Komodo Island
  • Benoa/Bali
  • Tanjung Priok, Jakarta
  • Singapore

Begin with a 2 night stay in Singapore, this compact city packs a punch with a blend of elements that come together in unexpected symphony. Savour its modern architectural marvels intertwined with flourishing nature and inspiring street food served side by side with Michelin star gourmet before embarking Noordam where you will port in fascinating destinations. Experience Indonesia, the Philippines & New Guinea. Sail to Australia and scenic cruises through the Great Barrier Reef and pass several volcanoes. Be amazed by the ports of call you travel to and soak up the cultural experiences. A real once in a lifetime experience.

Highlights

  • FREE Singapore Stay
  • FREE Singapore Gardens by the Bay Tour 
  • Legendary Voyage
  • Upgrade for only £60pp per day & get: Beverage Package, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion Discount, Gratuities & WiFi
  • Exclusive Savings of up to £3370 Per Couple

What's Included?

  • Return flights from the UK (call for regional departures)
  • FREE 2 night stay in Singapore on room only basis
  • FREE Singapore Gardens by the Bay Tour   
  • 28 night cruise on board Noordam on full board basis
  • Upgrade for only £60pp per day & get:  Beverage Package, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion Discount, Gratuities & WiFi
  • Baggage Allowance
  • Transfers

Prices From pp

Departure DateInteriorOceanviewBalconySuite
Jan 2025£3,749£4,089£4,859£6,599

Price based on flying from London. Prices are subject to availability and may change out with our control. Flight supplements from regional airports will apply. For a live price for your chosen date, airport and hotels please call our Cruise Experts.

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Noordam

Named for the Northern compass point, Noordam features museum-quality art — from 19th-century oils to contemporary photographs of music greats Dizzy Gillespie and B.

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Itinerary for Coral Triangle, Volcanos, Great Barrier Reef & Indonesia

Day 1 - Fly UK to Singapore

Day 2 - Arrive Singapore & transfer to hotel / Enjoy Singapore

Day 3 - Enjoy Singapore

Day 4 - Embark Noordam in Singapore

City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore's urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community. Singapore's food scene—which is arguably the world's most dynamic and runs the gamut from beloved street hawkers to Michelin-starred venues—would merit a trip alone, as would its never-ending shopping options. But the city is also packed with world-class museums, many designed by celebrated architects, and it hosts many major international events, such as the Formula One Grand Prix. Yet only about half of the 720-square-kilometer (278-square-mile) island is developed, which leaves plenty of room for parks and open spaces such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, where an old-growth forest still thrives.

Day 5 - At Sea

Day 6 - At Sea

Day 7 - Puerto Princessa, Palawan

Puerto Princesa, the capital of Palawan in the Philippines, is home to 250,000 people and offers a vastly different experience from Manila’s often overwhelming big-city dynamism. For many travelers, it’s simply a gateway to the resorts of El Nido, also on Palawan Island. Those who spend some time here, however, will discover a city that combines a laid-back vibe with beautiful sandy beaches and a wealth of marine life. Nearby, there are also lush mountains, rain forests, waterfalls and dramatic limestone cliffs. Among the most popular sights are the Immaculate Conception Cathedral, where visitors are welcome to celebrate Mass accompanied by choral singing; the Palawan Heritage Center, which displays local artworks and crafts; and the peaceful Palawan Butterfly Ecological Garden and Tribal Village. The city's biggest draws, however, are a boat trip through the limestone caves of the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, and the beaches and islands scattered around scenic Honda Bay—perfect for snorkeling, sunbathing and picnics. Speaking of food, a visit to the most famous restaurant in the city, Kalui, is guaranteed to be a memorable experience for seafood fans; adventurous foodies can order crocodile sisig, a traditional—and delicious—stir-fry dish.

Day 8 - At Sea

Day 9 - At Sea

Day 10 - At Sea

Day 11 - At Sea

Day 12 - Jayapura

An out-of-the-way gem, Jayapura offers picturesque white-sand beaches, roadside stands where you can dine on coconuts and fresh, grilled fish; and fascinating World War II history to explore.

Day 13 - At Sea

Day 14 - Rabaul

The East New Britain province of Papua New Guinea is lush and tropical. Mountain peaks and active volcanoes surround the town of Rabaul and Simpson Harbor. Built on an ancient volcanic crater, the harbor is one of the deepest in the region. For the same reason, some of most spectacular diving and snorkeling in the world can be found here. At Sub-Base, a shallow reef extends dramatically out from shore before dropping off into a crevasse rich with fish and other marine life. VIEW CRUISES

Day 15 - Kiriwina Island

Located in Papua New Guinea’s Milne Bay Province, Kiriwina is the largest of the Trobriand Islands and home to the majority of their 12,000-strong indigenous population. The picturesque island is steeped in history and is famous to many as a site of U.S. occupation during World War II. In fact, various relics of the war, including the remains of an American plane, can still be seen on the island. But Kiriwina is home to far more than history. Here, you’ll find an idyllic traditional lifestyle, incredibly friendly locals and a fascinating social structure that’s based on matrilineal clans, with unique marriage and courtship rituals. Many aspects of life revolve around the cultivation and exchange of yams.There’s also mesmerizing scenery, from crystal-clear waters to jungle-covered cliffs. Hire a dugout canoe, hike to the burial caves, peruse exquisite carvings and explore the coral-filled offshore islands. Be sure to stop and watch a game of Trobriand cricket, an innovative spin on the game. Whatever you choose to do, it’s bound to be an eye-opening experience.

Day 16 - Conflict Islands, PNG

Papua New Guinea is quickly becoming a favorite destination for cruise passengers, and it’s easy to see why when you visit the Conflict Islands. Although the name might not sound inviting (don’t worry, they're named after a British naval ship, not a war), these 21 islands are like paradise on earth: Tropical islets encircle an enormous turquoise lagoon formed by the rim of a sunken volcano, with vibrant coral reefs and rainbow schools of fish below the water. Located about 160 kilometers (97 miles) east of Papua New Guinea in the Coral Sea, the island group is owned by Australian businessman and conservationist Ian Gowrie-Smith, who is dedicated to protecting the ecosystem of the islands (he has an eco-resort on one island; the rest are uninhabited).Just as Papua New Guinea is one of the wildest and most diverse places on the planet, the seas here offer some of the world’s most extensive biodiversity and coral reefs, making for unparalleled kayaking, diving and snorkeling. There are hundreds of coral species and thousands of species of fish and invertebrates such as the sea cucumber. If you ever get bored with watching manta rays float past, lie back on the white sand, look up at the palm trees blowing in warm trade winds or watch the sun set over the lagoon, and dream of owning your own chain of tropical islands.

Day 17 - At Sea

Day 18 - Cairns

The gateway to Australia's Great Barrier Reef and the tropical north of the country, Cairns sits on the east coast of the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland. This laid-back city is popular with travelers who depart from here for days of sailing, diving, snorkeling and trekking through nearby parks—a celebrated launching pad especially for those who want to explore the reef, the Daintree Rain Forest and other attractions of this part of Queensland. And what better place to start one's adventure? The residents of Cairns are welcoming, the beach life fantastic and the climate consistently sunny and warm. Wend your way due east of Cairns, and you'll find yourself on the Great Barrier Reef, the world's longest coral reef and also the world's largest living organism. Famously visible from outer space, it's often been described as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Kuranda Scenic Railway is a different sort of wonder—an engineering marvel from the 19th century that passes through rain forests on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites before reaching the village of Kuranda. Green Island, a 6,000-year-old coral cay, is an easy day trip from Cairns with opportunities to snorkel and swim; Port Douglas, an hour north of Cairns, is a favorite with visitors thanks to its top-notch restaurants, art galleries and boutiques. Finally, hop on a six-person cable car known as the Skyway Rainforest Cableway for a bird's-eye view of the stunning natural appeal of the region.

Day 19 - At Sea / Ribbon Reefs

The Great Barrier Reef is made of many types of reefs, from offshore bommies that rise from the depths like undersea skyscrapers, to atolls where rings of coral surround placid lagoons. The Ribbon Reefs are another unique formation—long, narrow ridges of coral running parallel to the shore. They act like breakwaters, providing calm seas on their western sides, facing the Australian mainland. The Ribbon Reefs run for around 50 miles (80 kilometers), with a total of 10 ribbon reefs named by number, from south to north. Remote Lizard Island marks the northern reaches of this section of the Great Barrier Reef—the final landmark before sailing on to the Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait. The greatest highlights of the Ribbon Reefs are found below the water, where divers and snorkelers can explore undersea gardens bursting with corals, tropical fish, sharks and much more. Topside explorers should keep watch from the ship for dolphins and whales, especially during the months of June and July, when dwarf minke whales arrive from Antarctica to birth their young.

Day 20 - At Sea / The Far North Region / Scenic Cruising

Day 21 - At Sea

Day 22 - Darwin, Australia

Surrounded on three sides by the turquoise Timor Sea, the Northern Territory’s capital is closer in both distance and temperament to Southeast Asia than it is to most of Australia’s major cities. The lifestyle here is tropical, which means a relaxed atmosphere, balmy weather, fabulous fusion food and vibrant outdoor markets. This cosmopolitan city has fewer than 140,000 residents, but they include some 50 nationalities. After heavy bombing in World War II and a disastrous cyclone in 1974, Darwin has been largely rebuilt, and it's modern and well planned. In the downtown area you'll find everything from great shopping to a crocodile park. You can trace the region's dramatic history at innovative museums and gallery-hop to see indigenous art. After your sightseeing stroll, have a late lunch at one of the many excellent restaurants. The food options range from authentic Malaysian dishes like laksa, a spicy noodle soup, to a plethora of fresh seafood—mud crab, barramundi and more. You may find it hard to leave this laid-back lifestyle, but there's much more to see close by. Darwin is the gateway to two famous national parks, Kakadu and Litchfield, as well as the spectacular Aboriginal-owned Tiwi Islands. Make sure you take the time to "go bush," as they say in Australia—that is, get out of town and relax. There's no better place to do it than this glorious part of the country.

Day 23 - At Sea

Day 24 - Dili, Timor-Leste

Known as the “City of Peace,” Dili is the capital of East Timor, nestled between the sea and surrounding hills. Walk the bustling waterfront, hike the unspoiled jungle, snorkel among coral reefs.

Day 25 - Scenic Cruising

Day 26 - Komodo Island

One of more than 17,000 islands that make up the Republic of Indonesia, Komodo Island is most famous for its resident Komodo Dragons. The remnant of a once widespread ancient order of monitor lizards, this giant reptile often measures up to 11 feet in length and can weigh more than 300 pounds. Komodo Island is volcanic in origin, with dramatic landscapes of craggy mountains, deep canyons, savannahs and rain forests. Sample shore excursions: Komodo Island Trek.

Day 27 - Benoa/Bali

Indonesia is made up of more than 13,000 islands, but even with all that competition, Bali manages to stand out. Beautiful temples and shrines of all sizes are spread across the island, tucked down narrow alleyways, hidden within the jungle or serenely presiding over scenic locations, like the dramatic Pura Tanah Lot atop a rock formation just off Bali’s western coast. Bali is well known for its arts—traditional music and dance, painting, wood and stone carvings, silver jewelry and ikat and batik textiles. The island’s artistic center is the village of Ubud, and its art markets and boutiques carry beautiful Balinese pieces to take home. When it comes to dining, whether you’re craving a burrito or satay, you can find a restaurant that serves it. Don’t leave the island, however, without sampling Balinese cuisine. Local cooking, which reflects Chinese and Indian influences, uses blends of aromatic spices to season grilled meats (though not beef—Bali is an island of Hindu culture in mostly Muslim Indonesia), fresh seafood, rice and vegetables with delicious results.

Day 28 - At Sea

Day 29 - Tanjung Priok, Jakarta

Tanjung Priok is your gateway to Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city and exotic capital. Visit The National Museum of Indonesia chronicling sixteen centuries of history; explore Indonesian culture at Taman Mini Indonesia Indah; wander the streets of Old Town and learn about Dutch colonial architecture; tour Masjid Istiqlal (Independence Mosque), the largest mosque in Southeast Asia; and shop for treasures in one of the city’s excellent shopping malls.

Day 30 - Scenic Cruising

Day 31 - At Sea

Day 32 - Singapore, disembark & transfer to airport / Fly Singapore to UK

City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore's urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community. Singapore's food scene—which is arguably the world's most dynamic and runs the gamut from beloved street hawkers to Michelin-starred venues—would merit a trip alone, as would its never-ending shopping options. But the city is also packed with world-class museums, many designed by celebrated architects, and it hosts many major international events, such as the Formula One Grand Prix. Yet only about half of the 720-square-kilometer (278-square-mile) island is developed, which leaves plenty of room for parks and open spaces such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, where an old-growth forest still thrives.

Fly Singapore to UK/ Arrive UK

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